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20121207
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doors and figure how they get past january and how they avoid this fiscal cliff, not only the spending cuts and tax increases but spending cuts particularly in defense. they don't want that. >> explain why what they agree on -- namely that the middle class, 98% of all taxpayers, that their taxes will stay the same, they will not go up. if everyone agrees at least on that, the president says, go ahead and pass that. why not just eliminate the 98% who won't have any changes, those making under $250,000? why not allow that to go forward? why are the republicans resisting on that. >> it could wind up there, wolf. but if the republicans lose that, they believe they kind of lose the leverage that they have. if they sort of give on that, then where's their leverage with the white house? so i think that in the end, wolf, if i had to bet -- and i don't like to bet on these things because they always disappoint -- but i would have to say that the one thing they are all likely to do at some point is to make sure the taxes do not go up on the middle class. but in order to do that, republicans want
more focused on washington, on the whole policy issues around the fiscal cliff because they are trying to figure out their spending plans guessing what taxes will be. businesses are focused on if they spend x and taxed at y what's that going to leave them in terms of profitability. degree of which businesses have come off a really good four years where the rest of us have come off a more problematic four years. finally in this quarter partly because of the fiscal cliff, partly because of europe, partly because of slow down in china profits are more challenging for companies. but they are still making a lot of money. >> "wall street journal" study of 40 major companies half plan drastic cuts to their investments and spending into next. once a budget deal is reached, i mean whatever it is, do you think we'll see companies loosen their wallet? is there a bigger chance they will slow down more? >> part of this is contingent how well consumers do. companies will spend money if there's this active healthy consumer base that justifies them spending money for more activities. so, at some point
fall off the fiscal cliff. avoiding it -- if they do nothing, everyone's taxes go up and automatic spending cuts will take effect. no imminent deal is in sight. >> if they are going to force higher rates on virtually all americans, because they're unwilling to let tax rates go up on 2% of americans, then that's a choice we're going to have to make. >> i would say we're nowhere. period. we're nowhere. we have put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to try to get this question resolved. but the white house has responded with virtually nothing. they have actually asked for more revenue than they have been asking for the whole entire time. >> in other words not quite a good place to be, but both sides agree that the government needs to raise more money. how much and how they do it are two of the major sticking points. >>> and protests and a constitutional crisis, what is next for egypt. we'll dig deeper into the struggle for power between conservative islamists and liberal secularists. and later, brad pitt talks about his future with angelina jolie. >>> and a dog
cliff. we now know that we're 29 days away before the massive spending cuts and tax increases go into effect automatically the beginning of the year. the white house presented their plan and now just today we're getting news on the side of the republicans. ali velshi, chief business correspondent, let me bring you in. the first major difference, let's be crystal clear and run through this proposition, the fact that they want to extend the bush era tax cuts for everybody. >> right. something that some 67% of americans said that they don't agree with, something the white house says is a nonstarter. however, they have put a proposal forward. i suppose if you're negotiating, you don't put first proposal forward, the one you're going to end up with. this is from house speaker john boehner in a 2 1/2 page letter to the president, it proposes $2.2 trillion in cuts. and let me show you how they get there. $800 billion in tax reform. that is closing loopholes and credits. $600 billion in health care and medicare changes. $300 billion in other mandatory savings. $300 billion in discretiona
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4